Wednesday, May 24, 2017
   
Text Size

Mental Health

Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center offers mental health services to inmates within the Douglas County Correctional Facility.  Case managers and screeners are on-site limited hours per week and available on call 24 hours a day.  The mental health staff works with master's level students from KU and Washburn providing additional support.  They work with correctional staff to identify inmate suicide risk factors, review those placed on mental health watch status, and coordinate with the on call psychiatrist, who prescribes medications when needed.  In addition, Bert Nash staff provides the facility with inmate programs geared at changing criminal behaviors and overcoming substance abuse.

The care provided by the mental health staff follows the inmate after being released from the facility.  This is accomplished by working closely with the reentry director to help transition inmates with mental health issues back into the community.

If you have a mental health concern about an arrestee or inmate in the Douglas County Correctional Facility, who may harm himself or herself, another inmate and or an officer; whether it is based on a visitation session you had with the person, a phone call you had with the person, or due to his/her past history please notify a shift supervisor by dialing (785) 830-1000.


Suicidal Risk Factors include, but are not limited to:
  • Sleeping difficulties or irregular sleeping hours
  • Walking or moving constantly
  • Indifference towards personal physical appearance
  • Neglect or personal hygiene
  • Easily tired or general loss of energy
  • Weight loss or loss of appetite
  • Slumping when walking or sitting
  • Progressive health problems- chronic terminal illness
  • Sitting quietly in a fetal position
  • Staring at nothing- emotionally flat
  • Simply rocking back and forth
  • Self-injury or self-destructive behavior
  • Crying Frequently
  • Mood of Depression, apathy, despondency, or despair
  • Feelings of helplessness and hopelessness
  • Socially withdrawn
  • Giving away personal possessions
  • Speaking about or asking questions about death
  • Expressing suicidal thoughts or plans
  • Composing a suicide note
  • Talking of death and/or afterlife
  • Recently receiving long prison sentence
  • Highly agitated, afraid, or angry
  • Severe guilt, embarrassment, or shame; and overt psychosis, loss of reality, paranoia, delusions, and/or hallucinations



Click here for the Bert Nash website

Sheriff Ken McGovern

Sheriff McGovern

Translate

24.05.2017